Foxley's History

Foxley’s Art and Framing was established in 1984 by Bill and Genia Miller. Our first location was at 807 W. College Avenue. A year later, Foxley’s moved across the street and one block west to  728 W. College Ave. later that same year the business was given the opportunity to open a gallery in the lower level of  the Marshall Fields department store in downtown Appleton. While the Artwork was moved to the department store the frame shop  stayed at the 728 west College Ave. location. One year later Foxley’s was asked to run the art departments in the Milwaukee area Marshall Fields stores at their Mayfair Mall and Grand Avenue locations. In 1990 Marshall Fields was acquired by Dayton Hudson Corporation, which was in the process of building a store at the Fox River Mall in Grand Chute, (currently the Macy's  store). Subsequently, the Marshall Fields store in Downtown Appleton was slated for closure. Foxley’s frame shop and art gallery were thus reunited into  a 7,600 square foot building located at 623 W. College Avenue, on the corner of College avenue and Richmond street. This building  was originally built in 1900 as the Schiedermayer's Hardware store.   In 2011 the interior of the building was remodeled and the 13' tall ceiling's and original brickwork were exposed which has given the Gallery the look that you would expect to see in a large metropolitan area. With the passing of Genia Miller in 2001 and the retirement of Bill Miller in 2005 and his recent passing in 2018. Ownership of Foxley’s was passed to their son, Eric Miller  who has worked in the company since it’s founding in 1984.

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In May of 1984 the very first Foxley's Gallery opened at 807 W. College Ave. Two doors east of Frank's Pizza. 

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 In 1985 Foxleys moved  to  728 W. College Ave. next door to the Deli Sub Pub. Today it  is the site of  the Walgreens store. 

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In 1985 Foxleys opened an Art department in the Marshall Fields department store located at 122 east College Ave.  

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Our Current Building the way it looked in 1990.  

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Our Current Building from the inside in 1990. 

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The inside of our current building in 2000